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>> remembering mandela. south africans gather to mourn the loss of a man who changed the nation and inspire generations. nelson mandela has died at the age of 95. thank for joining us on "france ." people around the world are gathering to mourn the loss of nelson mandela. this friday everyone from heads of state to people on the street are remembering mandela, who was both inspirational and controversial. and ray brown looks back at the life of nelson mandela. born in the former trance state territory on july 18, 1918, nelson mandela was meant to become a tribal chief like his father. instead he became a lawyer and the first -- in the first lack legal practice in johannesburg. he joined the congress in 19 -- in -- in his practice, he was exposed to the inhumanity's of apartheid on a daily basis. he decided to fight back. opting for nonviolence as a strategy. he was first arrested in 1956 and prosecuted on treason charges, which were later dropped. nancyars later he married winnie.s when he -- >> there are many people who feel it is useless and futile for us to continue talking p
. >> his magnetic sense of humor, mandela was loved by everyone from world leaders to celebrities. >> when he visited the u.s., aretha franklin sang to him. tonight she's with us sharing her special memories only on "night line". >> this special edition of night line will be back in 60 sec >> this is a special edition of "nightline" nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >> good evening and thanks for joining us. nelson mandela's face is one of the most recognizable in the world. and tonight in south africa this symbol of racial equality died at the age of 95. from boxer to advocate, prisoner to peace prize winner, seemed mandela was always fighting for a cause greater than himself. it's clear that his legacy as a champion of human rights, equality and freedom will be forever etched in our minds and memories. >> like so many around the globe, i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. and so long as i live, i will do what i can to learn from him. >> to celebrities and mostly ordinary citizens of the world, an outpouring of love and mourning. we ar
today, and it was no more harsh than what bill keller pointed out. you know, what mandela -- he was associatesed with people that did the same things to their people, you know, gadhafi, castro that was done to him. and i think that was one moral failing. >> molly, is there something -- a lesson for the people on the american left for coming out of syria? >> i think syria has been an incredible challenge for the american left. on one hand, we want to claim that we are champions of freedom, but on the other hand, we've been incredibly conflicted as to what to do. do you arm the resist anticipate resistance in syria? do you reject anything that has to do with the american military? the american left didn't know. >> esther, molly, michael, thanks a lot. that is "all in" for this evening. we'll be back on monday. good night. >>> soon after nelson mandela was released it from prison in 1990, he came on a tour to the united states to raise funds here, to raise further support here for the anti-apartheid cause, but also to say thank you to americans who had supported him and supported s
! >> viva! >> pelley: tonight, a man for a rebel, a prisoner, a president. nelson mandela is dead at 95. >> take your guns, your knives and throw them into the sea! >> pelley: a revolutionary who fought for liberty, an icon who embraced peace. >> we are one country. we are one people. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. he gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided by their hopes and not by their fears. >> he did something remarkable. he built a genuine multiracial democracy in south africa. >> pelley: he was an inspiration to all who cherish freedom. >> i cherish the ideal of a new south africa. >> the legacy of mandela is of forgiveness and reconciliation. >> today, we can proudly say we are all south africans. >> he is revered around the world. he is almost like a saint. >> pelley: for south africa, he was "madiba," the father of a nation. >> africa! amandla! ( cheers ) ( national anthem plays ) captioning sponsored by cbs >> pelley: good evening. sunday in south africa will be a national day of prayer in honor of nelson mandela, a day to
edition of "nightline." nelson mandela. freedom fighter, leader, a symbol of racial equality. the man who changed his country and the world has died at age 95. tonight, we're live on the ground in south africa. from his long walk to freedom -- >> tonight we have only one guest, nelson mandela. >> -- "nightline" was there. >> to spend so many years at the prime of your life is a tragedy. >> how a young boxer fought his way through nearly 30 years in prison to become his country's first democratic elected president. >> he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. >> don't call me. i'll call you. >> to his magnetic sense of humor, mandela was loved by everyone. from world leaders to celebrities. when he visited the u.s., areeth that franklin sang to him. tonight she's with us sharing her special memories only on "nightline." >> this special edition of "nightline," nelson mandela, a man who changed the [s[man] no one told her,right?a. [son]hi! [mom screams] >>> this is a special edition of "nightline." nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >> good evening and thanks for joining
are watching al jazeera's special coverage of the death of nelson mandela. people all over the world mourning the death of the man they called madiba. these are the feeds coming live from johannesburg, outside the home of the south african antiapartheid hero. this is where he decide last night surrounded by his family. crowds of we'll wishers have been gathering, dancing, swimming, praising his life. they are there to celebrate his achievements and mourn his passing. nelson mandela, south africa's first black president was 95, dying in the company of his family after a long battle against lung infections. let's listen to what some of these people had to say gathered outside his home. >> i'm very sad. i met him when i was young. i grew up with him. i was very sad. i'm not happy that he gets to rest in piece. what he did for the country. i was telling my friend now, that if i was him i wouldn't be friends with him. i wouldn't be together. . >> obviously i'm shocked and sadden. it's hurtful. i was born in 1994. he fought for everything. i wouldn't be able to be here around my family. i hope he r
mandela's passing. she said it was one of her greatest honors to be invited to his home and called him humble, graceful and heroic. she hosted mandela on her show 13 years ago. >> i had said that you are one of the most humble person i ever met. i will tell you whether mr. mandela arrived today he said to our producer and said what is the subject of today's show? [ applause ] and she said nelson mandela. you are the subject of today's show. and he goes, oh, all right. >> she credits mandela as the inspiration for her school for girls in south africa. our coverage of nelson mandela's life and death continues later this half hour as we hear from mandela's jailer who describes their unusual and long-lasting friendship. you want to keep it here on abc news all morning long. >>> all right. we will turn to other major headlines beginning with something of a reversal by the white house involving the president's uncle who had been facing deportation from the u.s. omar and the president had never met but they said he lived with him three weeks while attending law school. it came after the j
>> nelson mandela as died today. it has just been announced. nelson mandela, who spent 27 years in prison. he was the first black elected president of stojakovic in 1994. let's learn more about his life. >> a freeman taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> from prisoner to president. nelson mandela's 1990 release from jail signaled the end of south africa's racist policy of apartheid. he would go on to become the untry's first true democratically elected leader. >> i, nelson mandela do here swear to be faithful to the republic of south africa. >> born to a chief of a small village, mandela was one of 13 children and the first member of his family to attend school. in the 1930's he began opposing authority and the authorities that made colored south africans second-class citizens. as white south africa became more aggressive, so did he. as the head of the armed wing of the african national congress, mandela led violent sabbatini town hall attacks and was arrested and tried in 1962. he would spend 27 years in jail, but he was never forgotten. eventually international an
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: nelson mandela has died at home in johanesburg, south africa, at the age of 95. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. we remember mandela, a towering man whose passion, sacrifice and battle against aparthied changed south africa and the world. >> woodruff: tonight we devote our whole program to life and legacy of nelson mandela. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: nelson mandela's death was formally announced late today by south africa's current president jacob zuma. he expressed the country's love and sense of loss for their i
contribons will live on forever. we send our heart felt sympathy to president mandela's president and to the citizen of the nation me loved. >> allen has more on nelson mandela's life. >> he was a prisoner and a president. a violent revolutionary and a moderate reformer. he was the face of change in turbulent south africa. his smile and his strength, power weapons in the fight for racial many people don't see it, against the government that applied. was on these savage attacks. leave south africa away from decades of racial separation and minority, white rule, was born in manage fella grew up in a rural roadless area near born to tribal royalty, he was adopted and raised by a chiefton after his father's death when he was just nine. he was the first in his y to attend school, where a missionary teacher gave him the first name nelson. his political activism began in college. join as boycott to school. he moved to johann studies law, and joins the african national congress, a political party and resistence moving fighting the segregation that was so deeply divisive. that passed laws
and not by fierce. >> mandela was born 1918 in eastern cape pro-vince, south africa. one of 13 children. he would go on to become a lawyer after a rare education in a white supremacist nation that was explicitly ordered around the oppression and degradation of the black majority of its people. mandela co-founded the youth league of the african national progress dedicated to equal rights and overthrowing the system of apartheid, the racial segregation upon which the republic of south africa had been founded. for this activity, the government armed with a vast secret police branded mandela an enemy of the state. mandela was forced into hiding. in a stunning 1961 broadcast, his first televised interview, the 42-year-old activist spoke with itn's brian woodlake. >> i asked him what it was that the africans really wanted. >> the africans require, want the franchise on the basis of one man, one vote. >> do you see africans being able to develop in this country without the europeans being pushed out? >> we have made it very clear in our policy that south africa is a country of many races. that there's room
from around the world. stay ahead on cnn. . >>> remembering nelson mandela. the world mourning the loss of a legend morning. the south african president hailed for his courage, his conviction, his decency. i'm john berman. >> i'm michaela pereira. we welcome our viewers in the u.s. and arnold the world. >> this is a special edition of "early start" beginning this morning because the world is grieving and, in some ways, celebrating a giant among men. nelson mandela whose unbreakable will and unsurpassed courage brought an end to an era of white domination in south africa. he is dead this morning at the age of 95. mandela was such a global icon with larger than life legend who went from a prison cell to the presidency and he did it with such unmashed grace. i want to bring in arwa damon when is live in johannesburg in south africa. >> reporter: nelson mandela a hero, a legend, an icon. so many of the people we are speaking to here will say that hardly truly encompasses what it was that he meant for this nation and what it was that he allowed this nation to become. behind me is th
? >> for a long time, south africans have always known that mandela was very ill. he was 95 years old. we had been told by families, by members of the presidency and government that he was stable but critical. we knew that he was frail. a lot of people have been expecting this news as long as nelson mandela had been released from prison but now that it has it is after midnight right now. a lot of people will not have heard what has happened. we're likely to see people bit of openery space everywhere in south africa. they will be mourning their hero, their father. that he we we called him in south africa. father to the nation. he is not a saint but he has been good for the reconciliation process of south africa. >> james, i will be with you in a second but i do want to bring ofwers to this view president obama. here is what he had to say. nelsonis trial in 1964, mandela close to statement from the dock saying i have fought against white domination and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideals of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony an
mandela has died after a long battle with the recurring not long in the us at the age of ninety five. thank you so much for joining us for fools think i'm only home this friday people around the world are paying their respects to nelson mandela the ninety five year old died thursday evening at his home in johannesburg was battling a reoccurring a long illness. mandela had been receiving intensive care at his home in this friday everyone from heads of state to people on the street are remembering mandela was both inspirational and controversial. kyle brown takes a look back now the life of the us mandela when the former trend state eritrean july eighteen nineteen eighteen. nelson mandela was meant to become a tribal chief. just like his father. instead he became an aliya in the first thought legal practice in johannesburg. he joined the african national congress korean sea in nineteen forty four. apartheid was introduced for use later. his practice monday that was exposed to the new manatees of apartheid on that day basis. and he decided to fly back to the norm finances the strategy w
him a lot. their first meeting, he told me, was one just to get together. he had summoned mandela from the prison and they just had a get-together meeting that first time, and then that led to the gradual partnership that dismantled apartheid and brought democracy and freedom to south africa, and showed that actually, majority can rule. wolf? >> a truly, truly amazing man who made such a unique difference to the world, not only to south africa, but to the entire world. christiane, i want to show our viewers a live picture of his home now. people are beginning to gather. this is outside of johannesburg in south africa. only beginning to pay respects to nelson mandela at the age of 95, who has just passed away. we heard the announcement from jacob zuma, the president of south africa. we want to welcome our viewers who may just be tuning in here in the united states and around the world. we'll have special breaking news coverage of the death of nelson mandela here in "the situation room." we're watching what's going on, christiane and robyn kurnow is in johannesburg watching what's going
nelson mandela at the age of 95. our coverage continues with the ed show. >> good evening, americans and welcome to the ed show tonight. we start with tragic breaking news. former south african president nelson mandela died at the age of 95. mandela, a remarkable life dedicated his to fighting for civil rights in south africa. mandela lived long enough to see a multiracial democratic south africa. he called it the rainbow nation. the grief over his death crossed racial lines ha he devoted his to erasing. a young man at the age of 25, he joined the african national congress in 1956. mandela was arrested with 155 other political activists and was changed with high treason. the treason trial lasted 4 1/2 years. the charges against him were ultimately dropped. mandela used a false identity to evade the government and traveled to europe and other countries in africa to built support for the anc and study guerilla warfare. when he returned to south africa in 1962, mandela was arrested and sentenced to years in prison. during his sentence, the government charmed mandela and other anc leader
mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc and the other major organizations opposing apartheid in south africa had been organized as nonviolent movements, nonviolent resistance, and nonviolent organizing. but after sharpville, they decided that maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville, they decided they would form a paramilitary wing, and nelson mandela was one of the anc leader who is went underground to help start it. they said they would target government buildings and strategic infrastructure and they would try to sabotage the state. after sharpville, the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the anc. they made it illegal to be a member of that group. nelson mandela was arrested for treason in 1961, he was acquitted and he was convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on south africa's version of alcatraz, which is robin island. while he was already serving that sentence, while he was already in prison, they put him on
the scalp. selsun blue itchy dry scalp. mandela being alive, now that he's gone, there's so much more progress to be made. where do they stand economically? >> there's still a lot of problems. there's de facto segregation, economic problems, educational problems that south africa needs to advance on in order to realize the society that nelson mandela had in mind for south africa. i got to tell you, being in south africa, the folks there, from all different colors, all different backgrounds, all different socio-economic levels, they're talking about these things and really feel like together they will be able to do so much more. >> abc's lana zak, thank you so much. >> the coverage of nelson mandela's life and death does not end here. see how his story influenced pop culture and moviemakers later in this half-hour. >>> another major headline this morning, the investigation into the shooting of an american teacher in libya. ronnie smith gunned down while jogging at a u.s. consulate in benghazi. his murder comes days after al qaeda called for libyan attacks on u.s. interests. smith's wif
's time for the last word. >>> nelson mandela told his biographer men come and go, i have come, and i will go when my time comes. nelson mandela's time came today. >> i pledge to use all my strength and ability to live up to expectations. i am your servant. i don't come to you as a leader. >> nelson mandela has departed this earth at the age of 95. >> the founding president has departed. >> the day he was released from prison gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided by their hopes and not their fears. >> na is the man the world has been waiting to see, his first public appearance in nearly three decades. >> the basic issue is the demand of one person, one vote. >> nelson mandela has become a philosophier king, setting out his vision of what he thinks the future of south africa should be. >> prison is just not a place. >> we will likely not see the likes of nelson mandela again to make decisions by love, not by hate, to strife for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. >> it is not the individuals that matter. i am your ser vantd. i don't come to you as a lead
of the greatest men of our time is dead tonight. nelson mandela passing away today at the age of 95. shortly after his death, south african president jacob zuma addressed the nation. >> fellow south africans, our beloved nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation has departed. our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. >> south africa and the world in mourning at this moment. world leaders expressing their condolences. president obama addressed us earlier this evening. >> he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today he's gone home. and we've lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or a policy or politics was a protest against aparthe apartheid. i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided
, including many women and irn ch. in the end, it killed 69 people. at the time nelson mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc opposing apartheid had been organized as non-violent resistance. but after sharpville, they decided maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville they decided they would form a paramilitary wing and nelson man delg la was one of the anc leaders who went undergroutd to help it. they would target infrastructure and try to sabotage the state. after sharpville the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the a nchnc. they made it illegal to be a part of that group. nelson mandela was arrested in 1961, again in 1962 and convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on robben island. while he was already serving that sentence they put him on trial again, this time for sabotage. and they convicted him, and they sentenced him to life in prison, to life on robben island. so in 1964 he began a new sentence that was a life
mandela, the anti-apartheid leader and first black president of south africa. >>> rival forces continue to clash in the central african republic. at least 100 people are reported dead. >>> and in a remote area of northeastern japan, a group of architects has been working not just to rebuild houses but to revive shattered communities. >>> millions of people around the world are remembering and paying tribute to the man who is considered the father of modern south africa, nelson mandela has died. he was 95, known respectfully as madiba by south africans, he dedicated his life to the fight against apartheid and went on to become the country's first black president. nhk world's chie yanagichi reports. >> reporter: the news was shocking but not unexpected. >> fellow south africans, our beloved nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation, has departed. >> reporter: minutes after president jacob zuma announced mandela's death, south africans started to mourn and remember. >> so painful. i just can't believe it. >> we cry with the family and the nation, we have a great loss.
. ♪ >>> and this morning, the world celebrates the life of nelson mandela. >> we have never doubted in our mind, even during the darkest hours of our struggle, that eventually we would win. >> he calls himself an ordinary man who became a leader because of extraordinary circumstances. >> sometimes it's calls for a nation to be great. let your greatness blossom. >> this morning, his life, his legacy. >> as long as injustice exists in our world, none of us can truly rest. >> we talk to the people whose lives he touched. this is a special edition of "good morning america," remembering nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >>> we do say good morning, everyone. and we are celebrating the life of one of the most remarkable men in history. he has been called the apostle of reconciliation. a leader who inspired so many, with his own fight for freedom and justice for all. we have so many pictures that we're going to share with you. this, outside of his home in south africa. crowds gathering all around the world. tributes pouring in from around the globe this morning. >> 95 years old. a monumental life.
is headed east. >> south africa will honor nelson mandela with more than a week of memorial events. he died at the age of 95. his countrymen are grieving, but many are using his passing to celebrate a life well lived. we have the story now from johannesburg. >> reporter: it's the night of chanting for the man who they call father. father of the nation being celebrated for incredible grace, the man who transcended class and race. for south africans the day is for morning. mandiba, he was the father of the nation is it. >> they would come together and mourn. >> he might have been sicked for a long time, but people here are shot. they're mourning for their leader. >> we knew that this would come because of mandiba's age there is a huge sense of loss you. >> young and old, white and black, remembered his grace, his generosity of spirit. >> i'm just glad he did all he did for us. hopefully we continue the legacy he left. >> reporter: a legacy of forgiveness and reconciliation that this country is deeply missing. over the next ten days mandela's body will lie instate. mandela always said that a m
today. >>> good morning. i'm chris jansing. this morning we remember nelson mandela. in life he united south africa and the world and his legacy as a fighter for freedom will continue to resonate well after his death. icon, legend, hero. none of those words seem quite big enough to describe a man who changed the world. ♪ and yet in the streets of johannesburg, the crowds are celebratory. south africa planning ten days of mourning. mandela's body will lie in state with leaders from all over the world expected to pay respects. here in the united states, flags are flying at half staff. mandela had a huge impact on president obama inspiring him to public service. the two only met once in 2005 when president obama was then senator obama. >> i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> mandela spent 27 years behind bars for treason, for backing an anti-apartheid charter. he was finally released february 11, 1990.
of nelson mandela. former secretaries of state colin powell and james baker share their memories with us. plus, rock star bono on his friend's wisdom and courage. >>> relentless cold batters much of the country. the ice storm threatens to disrupt the lives of millions. >>> and one of the last survivors of what could be the most important treasure hunt history. >>> but today, your world in 90 seconds. >> for me, he had hope, he represented freedom. so, today, i'm here to show i'm thankful for him! the world mourns the passing of an icon. >> nelson mandela died at his home surrounded by his family. >> went from the prison cell to the presidency with such unmatched grace. >> i think we try to prepare ourselves, but emotionally, it's not that easy. >> crowds gathering outside the home in johannesburg. ♪ >> he was a father figure to the nation. the one thing we all had in common. >> justice for all, let freedom ring. god bless. >> millions of americans are facing another big blast of winter weather. >>> the november jobs report. 203,000 jobs added in november. the jobless rate fell to 7%. >
to the ages. >> what made nelson mandela great was precisely what made him human. we saw in him what we seek. >> good evening from washington. in its own way is in a state of mourning tonight. nelson mandela was historic figure, inspiration and role model for africans, south africans, but americans as well in our own troubles racial history and struggle to overcome that mirrored to americans in the life and the struggle and the suffering and then the triumph and the leadership of nelson mandela whose passing at 95 was noted by his successor, south african president, jacob zuma. >> yet, what made nelson mandela great was precisely what made him human. we saw in him what we seek in ourselves. and in him, we saw so much of ourselves. >> reporter: one of those who says he was especially inspired is american president, barack obama, who shared his reaction a few moments ago to the passing of south africa's first black president. >> i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison, gave me a sense of what human beings can do when guided by hopes and not fears. like so
by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> thanks, good evening everyone. we're devoting this hour to nelson mandela. very few people transformed their country. the crowd outside his house speak to that. ♪ ♪ >> sad news, there is a sense of celebration how far nelson mandela brought south africa and brought us all and opened our eyes to better angels to justice over injustice and compassion in the face of cruelty and sometimes in an unforgiving world to forgiveness. >> this is the moment of our deepest sorrow. our nation has lost his greatest son, yet, what made nelson mandela great was precisely what made him human. we saw in him what we seek in ourselves. >> south africa's president announcing the death a short time later, president obama paid a deeply personal tribute. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, he transformed south africa and moved
ten days. >> mandela will be laid to rest with a state funeral sunday, december 10th. leading up to the service, zuma declared this sunday, december 8th, a national day of prayer and reflection. there will be a massive public memorial at the soccer stadium in johannesburg that hosted the world cup. he'll lie in state for three days at pretoria city hall. flags are at half staff in the capitol and white house as well, which confirmed this morning that president obama and first lady michelle obama will participate in memorial events. the guest list for his funeral will likely include every living u.s. president able to travel along with dignitaries from around the world and celebrities across the globe today, countless newspapers paying tribute. as president obama says now belongs to the ages. >> we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. >> and this morning, on the "today" show, former secretary of state colin powell who attended mandela's inauguration, shared what he meant to him. >> a
nelson mandela. >> nelson mandela closed a statement from the dock saying, "i have fought against white domination and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. it is an ideal i hope to live for and to achieve. but if need be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die." nelson mandela lived for that ideal and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today, he has gone home. we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. .e no longer belongs to us he belongs to the ages. dignity andfierce unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, he transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from imprisonment to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer power and reconcile with those who jailed him set an example that all of huma
nelson mandela. >> here in the u.s. we're tracking a dangerous ice storm. forecasters saying it could be the worst ice storm ever for the region. people are waking up without power but millions could end up losing electricity for weeks, they fear, this as temperatures continue to plummet. >> we'll continue to what's going on but we want to react to the passing of nelson mandela. here's a live look at the crowds that have been gathered outside the late south african leader's home. they're singing, their dancing, nations, of course, showing their respect. flags around the world at the white house we'll show you, see it, half-staff. this morning, honoring the anti-apartheid leader's life and legacy. we'll follow the developments from every corner of the world. let's bring with robyn curnow. she's in johannesburg. >> the news came just before midnight south african time that nelson mandela had gone. so many south africans woke up to this stark, gut wrenching head line. this says "hamba kahle madiba." >> it was an announcement heard around the world. >> our beloved nelson mandela, the foun
for this special edition of "cnn newsroom" as we remember the life and legacy of nelson mandela. first breaking news in the last hour, brand new jobs report is out with the lowest unemployment rate in five years. we'll tell you how the markets and the white house are responding this morning. >>> also an arctic blast, this is dallas, where the mercury has dropped 50 degrees in just the last 24 hours. colossal ice storm putting on the freeze from texas to tennessee. and in johannesburg, remembering the man who went from prisoner to president, we'll have the latest on funeral plans for the anti-apartheid icon, nelson mandela. >>> first to that breaking news on the economy, americans are getting back to work, 203,000 jobs were added to payrolls in november, and the unemployment rate ticked two notches lower to 7%. that's the lowest unemployment rate in five years. our chief business correspondent christine romans is here to break down the numbers. better than expected, so should we feel absolutely completely good about this? >> i saw some broad-based strength in these numbers from warehousing to re
-- nelson mandela. he was 95. lost itstion has greatest son. our people have lost a father. although we knew that this day diminishe, nothing can our sense of the profound and .nduring loss >> of mandela served for five years as the first black resident of south africa after the african national congress artie help end apartheid in 1994. guy johnson has more on the mandela legacy. firstree man takes his steps into a new south africa. >> from prisoner to president, his 1990 release from jail signaling the end of the racist policy of apartheid. he would go on to become the country's first truly democratically elected leader. >> i do hereby promise to be faithful to the republic of south africa. wasorn to a local chief, he one of 13 children and the first member of his family to attend school. he began opposing the white minority a policy of apartheid, laws that segregated society and made colored south africans second-class citizens. byst, mandela was moved gandhi. more aggressive, so did he. as the head of the armed wing of led ational congress, he violent sabotage attacks and was arrested an
mandela has passed away. >> it is a sad day but a day unfortunately we knew was coming as nelson mandela had been in failing health for some time and the news came from the current south african president jacob zuma who said and i quote here, "he is resting. he is now at peace. our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father." you're looking at some images of nelson mandela through the years really considered to be the father of modern south africa, a great unifier of both white and black south africans, spent 27 years as a political prisoner and in spite of that rose to become the president of the nation and as you can hear, people talk about his generous spirit. >> truly a symbol of peace and forgiveness as well. we have heard reports that he was with family and friends at his house last night when he passed away. some close family friends were also in johannesburg in south africa when he did. >> vinita nair has a look back at nelson mandela's life and legacy. >> and one wonders what must be passing through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> reporter: after 27 y
. >> it will have an impact. the world of course wakes up to the death of nelson mandela. >> the world is mourning and as we mourn, we are waiting to hear news about funeral arrangements. the funeral will be held in about 10 days. there is not only going to be a public memorial but a private memorial. >> of course we'll have complete coverage go and through mr. mandela's legacy throughout the program. manus, we have a lot of data. we have tensions easing a touch. we'll go through what nelson mandela gave to the world. what else are we watching today? >> >> the germans have a healthy look at inflation. next year, germany will grow by 1.7%. we go to the unemployment numbers later today. euro/dollar is declining to 1.4616 despite yesterday's e.c.b. move yesterday or lack of movement yesterday and lack of christmas party for the market remains high. the drop has stopped for now. let's put it that way. the u.k. had its longest losing streak since april. down over 2.5% this week. the dax is at a three-week low. continuing a little bit lower despite that upgrade to growth. goldman sachs and deutsche deut
are remembering nelson mandela, a man who changed this world. president obama saying just hours ago he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. at 95, his death not a surprise, but the lessons of his life still reverbrating around the globe, that long walk to freedom, brimming with humility, resilient, a determination to forgive. and there has been a huge outpouring of emotion, reaction from around the world tonight, our team there starting with abc's chief foreign correspondent terry moran who joins us right now from london. terry? >> reporter: it is a profound moment for south africa and really for the world, the marking of the passing of this remarkable man and of the end of an era in human grace and dignity. in south africa itself, in the neighborhood which was a segregated township where nelson mandela lived before he went to prison for 27 years and where he went home to. there is a combination of mourning, of sorrow and celebration and gratitude, people gathering outside of his home and dancing, celebrating the life of nelson mandela. reaction pouring in from around the world for h
>> our beloved nelson mandela, president of our democratic nation has departed. >> farewell. apartheido overcame reaches the end of the journey that took them from prisoner to president. >> it is jobs day. a role data could leave the u.s. track for the best year of job growth since 2005. >> japan's prime minister calls for a summit with china to ease tensions over the islands. good morning. welcome. " live watching "the pulse from bloomberg european headquarters here in london. >> also coming up on "the pulse ," the boss of one of britain's businesses, nigel wilson joins us and about 10 minutes. get his take on everything from the u.s. jobs report to the autumn statement. the news cycle is being dominated by one thing and that is the passing of nelson mandela. south africans are mourning the death of their first black president this morning. leaders around the world pay tribute to his life. johannesburgin yesterday. .et bring in tv africa anchor clearly south africa in a state of shock this morning. we knew he was ill -- we knew he would be in intensive care and for quite so
african president nelson mandela from 1994. his state of the nation address the year he was elected president. the first immense critically held elections in that country. minutes, your5 reaction and thoughts on the death of nelson mandela. if you're the eastern and central time zones, -- you can reach us on twitter. #is c-hest tag -- the span chat. the white house tweeted out this comment. rest in peace, nelson mandela. that is a picture from his visit to south africa. a number of remarks and comments from other politicians and statesmen as well. former presidents. jimmy carter sending a statement that reads rosalynn and i are of nelsony the death mandela. -- that is from jimmy carter. let's go to your calls. go ahead. jacksonville florida? sonia inove on to tampa. caller: the world is saddened. we have lost an example of what a man and what a person who cares and was able to forgive. he really led by example. is, why did we leave him in prison so long, and not try to free him in the 20 years that he was in prison? to come out forgive, and not focus on that is something people shou
belongs to the ages. >> nelson mandela. revolutionary, president, prisoner. and prophet. >> sometimes, it falls bonn a generation to be great. let your greatness blossom. >> this morning, how he transformed our world. the lessons for our politics today. and a look back at his remarkable interview with ted koppel, just days after leaving prison. >> to spend 27 years, at the prime of your life, is a trag y tragedy. >> then -- >> we can't survive -- >> from wendy's to the white house. america debates inequality, growth, and fairness. we tackle it with two key senators, plus james carville and mary matalin join our powerhouse round table. right here, this sunday morning. >>> from abc news, "this week" with george stephanopoulos starts right now. >>> hello, again. in south africa today, preparations for the most massive memorial service in memory. pope francis, four american presidents, the dalai lama and dozens of world leaders will be there tuesday to pay tribute to a giant of our time. we'll reflect on nelson mandela this morning. first, let's go to chief foreign correspondent terry mo
or or or or the south africans are taking in a future with alex nelson mandela off the day that the country's first black president that the struggle against apartheid. normal people that the gathering of the family home in johannesburg when he died in the company of his family after a long illness he was ninety five. early this year he'd spent months in hospital with the money infection. the announcement last night was made by the current president. for those of the pickens. going out to see what he does someone do. the funding president. let him open to the nation. this deprives the pasta farm. his footy the new company or peas from elite. how tolerant. today is tuesday on the stage. hope to serve them all the lights people gathered to share the news and celebrate the life of the man who sold the end of white minority rule and symbolize reconciliation and peaceful coexistence with that at this day to day. i think the effect is pot tonight and he didn't feel well and about i keep calling it that all we could eat it with all of you know. yes it says that she gets it. i sit there if you should celeb
:00. >>> there is mr. nelson mandela a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> south africa and the world mourns the loss of a hero and an icon. nelson mandela was 95. he spent decades fighting apartheid in his native south africa. >> i'm anne makovec live in the newsroom. as the world remembers mandela, we here in the bay area remember his-historic visit to the east bay and congressional legislation and divesting in south africa. >> reporter: bundle up. it is still cold out here. i'm kiet do. we have a live report. >>> yeah, freezing temperatures again around the bay area. freeze warnings are up. what a chilly day. this is the third day in a row of freezing temperatures showing up outside. some of those numbers dropping off under clear skies this morning into the 20s and 30s. now 23 in santa rosa. 28 in concord. 39 in san francisco. and 30 degrees in livermore. so a very cold start to the day again freeze warnings until 9:00. then clouds roll in in the middle of the day. plan on highs only in the 40s and 50s. this afternoon we could see a little rain. and then tonight, cold
mandela in just a moment. but there is some breaking news this morning on two fronts, afghanistan and iran. we want to go first to liz palmer who is just arrived in tehran. >> the first big milestone in the post geneva era of nuclear cooperation between iran and the west have been passed, bob. there is a highly controversial reactor outside of tehran which could in the end produce plutonium which could be used for a bomb. it's been off limits to the international agency inspectors, but today they were allowed access to the site. i should stress that this deal, this cooperative deal is not universally popular here in iran. the president gave a big speech at a university yesterday and he was heckled by hardliners who really feel as if his reformist government has sold out. he was also heckled by students who want more reforms, political and economic and they want them faster. which really underlines how he is going to have to tread a very clever, diplomatic path from here on in. >> schieffer: all right. liz palmer, this story is going to go on all week, we know you'll keep us posted as it u
let me explain what i mean; it is a serious point. mandela was receiving power at a stage when most of the struggle had already been won, and de klerk was having to persuade his own people to give power up before they had been defeated. this was a different situation the world had not seen such a situation before. to his credit, de klerk realised that he needed the legitimacy of the electorate of south africa, who were, quite wrongly but in practice, were all white at that time. he called the referendum and, by the sheer force of his leadership, persuaded more than 60% of white south africans to accept that the days apartheid were over. even then, it required mandela, and it is to his credit, to go through long months of negotiation, not always with the support of his colleagues in the anc, in order to deliver not just a transfer of power that offered the prospect of peace for all the people of south africa. mandela once notably said, "this is not about moving from white domination to black domination. there must be no domination of either community." he was an extraordinary man in
see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us as best we can to forward the example that he set. to make decisions guided not by hate but by love. >> president obama leading our nation in mourning. former south african mandela, his death 24 hours ago was not unexpected but caused a deep sense of loss and outpouring of memories and condolences. he spent 95 years on this earth. 27 of them in prison for treason. he led the crusade against apartheid and for human dignity and reconciliation and won the 1993 nobel peace prize and became the first black president and nation's first democratically elected president and touched millions of lives around the world. mandela compares to dr. king and gandhi as nonviolent agents of change and progress. pope francis said the sted fast commitment in proving dignity and forging a new south africa built on firm foundations on nonviolence should inspire generations to put it in front of their political aspirations. plans are already under way for memorials and of course his state funeral. here in america, flags are lowered at the capitol and th
. a second storm is forming right now. we're live with the forecast. and beyond borders, how nelson mandela influenced civil rights leaders here and his complicated relationship with the united states. >>> also at this hour, on the record right now, president obama is wrapping up remarks about israel during a time of tension over iran. these are some live pictures. the president literally just wrapping up. more from the white house. >>> and the budget breakthrough, a rare bipartisan plan is in the works right now. i'll ask a gop congresswoman if they'll make deadline day. >>> there will be a lot of friendships made and other kids will have a friend to play with. >> and the buddy bench. one second-grader's idea to solve loneliness is today's big idea. a lot to get to. >>> we start this hour with the release of 85-year-old american veteran merrill newman. newman arrived at san francisco international airport about two hours ago to applause. he was holding his wife's hand. the north korean government released newman late last night. they'd been holding him in the country since october. as you
for what promises to be a truly epic memorial for nelson mandela. we will be live which details. first, let's go to kate which this top story. >> we will be checking in which you. let's gen here back at home which a massive winter storm, icing the east coast, air travel is an absolute nightmare. more than 1,100 flights already scrubbed today following 2,100 flights cancelled on sunday. if that's not good, people have been forced to sleep on cots at the airport a. highway nightmare from wisconsin to maryland. hundreds of wrecks. dozens deadly. we have this storm covered beginning which meteorologist indra petersen. how is it looking now? >> no stranger to travel delays. ten hours i was stuck last week on the tarmac. i know i was not alone. this storm wreaked havoc which freezing rain, rain itself and snow and ice across a huge chunk of the country. snow, freezing rain and dangerous ice. >> oh! oh my god. >> reporter: in plano, texas, people caught cascades of ice shooting down from rooftops. >> oh my god. >> reporter: another storm is wreaking havoc across much of the nation t. frej id storm
90 heads of state as the nation prepares to honor the life nelson mandela. >> oh, boy. falling ice in texas, of all places. crashing into parked cars. thankfully not people. severe weather continues right across the country. >>> and soccer fans turning violent in brazil, causing police to use tear gas and rubber bullets to stop the fighting. welcome to around the world". i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company. we'd like to welcome viewers not just here in the united states but indeed, all around the world. >>> day four of the mourning period for nelson mandela, and the world's focus on south africa unwavering. >> and that is how it is done. there is sadness mixed also with celebration. you see the dancers there as mourners flock to mandela's home in johannesburg. people of all different faiths, races, backgrounds together paying tribute to the icon who reshaped the country and really became a global symbol of peace. the diversity of the crowds a testament to what he accomplished in that once bitterly segregate the society. >> leaders from around the wo
to do the miracle story, you know? nelson mandela was the miracle leader of the exceptional place, the rainbow nation, etc., you know, we tell the story and sing "kumbaya", do a little dance. [laughter] one version. and the other version is it's all crap, right? it was all soiled and terrible trick that the nc played. and so i kind of figured i would get pegged as one or the other. rhea milan said i seemed to be immune to pessimism, and i actually take that as a point of ride. also not softheaded or softhearted about what i'm seeing. that's the kind of trip that i tried to make. so the reviews have been quite good. seems to be selling and sort of bracing for that first really brutal review. it hasn't happened yet. >> have you heard from zuma? >> i have heard indirectly from president zuma who gave me a lot of time, eight interviews, more time than anybody else has ever had from him. and i kind of expected, i don't know, actually, what i expected. he's still trying to absorb what he thinks of the portrait that's been drawn of him, is the best way to put it. >> and my final question
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